Find Out Which Quit Smoking Methods Work Best

This is a guest post coming from Marie Rienzo of National Tobacco Cessation Collaborative (NTCC) a non-profit group. They are sharing a GUIDE (for free) based on their research which compares different smoking cessation methods based on success rates, cost and availability.

NOTE: Bear in mind that the method to quit is secondary, the most important thing for you to do is to find out and follow the one that works best for you and work at all cost to become a non-smoker.

If you’ve ever looked into how to quit smoking for yourself or a friend, you know there are many options out there. Even with information on the web and advice from friends and family, it can be hard to know what will work best.

What Works to Quit: A Guide to Quit Smoking Methods [please follow the link below] can help you choose what’s right for you.

What Works to Quit uses a straightforward star rating system to show the effectiveness of quit smoking treatments. On one easy-to-read card you can compare 17 options.

Using the guide you can check to see the effectiveness of counseling and support methods as well as medications and alternative methods, such as acupuncture and hypnosis. You can also look up the effectiveness of combination methods, such as counseling plus medication. All of the information is divided by success rates, cost and availability.

For example, below is a list from the guide of some of the most, and least, effective treatment options.

4 stars:

• In-person counseling and support plus medication
• Telephone counseling and support plus medication

3 stars:

• Varenicline Pills (Chantix)
• Combined Nicotine Replacement Therapies

2 stars:

• Nicotine Gum
• Nicotine Patch
• Nicotine Inhaler
• Nicotine Nasal Spray
• Nicotine Lozenge

1 star:

• Internet Quitting Programs
• Self-Help Quitting Guides and Other Materials

No stars:

• Acupuncture
• Hypnosis
• Laser Therapy

The What Works To Quit guide was developed by an objective panel of tobacco cessation experts and represents a consensus from the scientific community. The guidelines are based on published, evidence-based research.

The ratings presented in the guide are primarily founded on the findings and conclusions of Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence: Clinical Practice Guideline (2008 update), sponsored by Public Health Service, a division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

The number of stars assigned to each treatment method is based on odds ratios and estimated quit rates as determined through research studies. The number, range and consistency of research studies on each method were also taken into account.

The What Works To Quit guide is published by the National Tobacco Cessation Collaborative (NTCC), a non-profit group funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institutes of Health, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, American Legacy Foundation and American Cancer Society.

To find out more about us, visit the NTCC website: www.tobacco-cessation.org or the What Works to Quit website: www.WhatWorksToQuitSmoking.org.

If you have any interesting story or any article geared in stopping nicotine addiction please read our submission guidelines if you want to share them, thank you.

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